Kendine Yeterli Toplum: Yerellik ve Doğayla Uyumlu Ekolojik Yaşam

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Permaculture aid From Absence to Abundance in Turkey

Published in Permaculture Activist,  Issue #87, February 2013.

Permaculture aid

From Absence to Abundance in Turkey

Emet Değirmenci and Yeliz Mert

As a former seismologist who has taken many field trips to measure aftershocks, I (Emet) have seen how difficult earthquake survivors’ lives can be. Currently, I’m a permaculture designer and teacher. After the deadly earthquake in Van, Turkey on Oct. 23, 2011, I issued a call to the permaculture-related groups in Turkey. It took us seven months to become organized and complete the assessment of local needs, and match those needs with the available skill set. Also, some team members were living abroad when the earthquake occurred.

Our group, consisting of one instructor, two new permaculture designers including Yeliz and one amateur documentary maker, delivered a permaculture aid program to the survivors over five days in July 2012. Our budget from small individual donations was less than US$1000. We didn’t want any funding from institutions because aid distribution is often corrupted following earthquakes and other natural disasters. Also, the area, which is predominantly Kurdish speaking, was quite politicized. We decided to keep the project independent and not to be manipulated by any groups in any way.

The project that we implemented included a winter vegetable garden built and planted with hugelkultur technique, biochar stove and solar oven construction, seed sprouting, vertical gardens, food-forest establishment techniques, herb spiral, hot composting, and a grey-water treatment. Ercis was the epicenter of the earthquake. One-third of the town was destroyed, and more than 500 hundred people died, with many wounded. We named the project the Van-Ercis Post-Disaster Ecological Restoration Permaculture Project. With the motto, “From Absence to Abundance,” we aimed to eliminate the negative influence of the words such as disaster and earthquake and to show how much we can do with the things that are called waste without realizing its value.

The people and the location

A five-day intensive hands-on project was held in our host Ceylan’s extended family’s courtyard garden, and we also used the Technical High School in Ercis for the biochar stove and solar oven workshops. The eldest of the family, a 78-year-old grandmother, has been living in this location with her three children, three daughters-in-law and eight grandchildren in different houses. While walking through the streets of Ercis, we witnessed the wreckage and cracked buildings of empty houses and workplaces at every corner, although most of the debris had been cleared. Like a movie scene, this disaster was first-hand reality for Ceylan’s family. The local people we met in Ercis instantly started telling their memories of the earthquake without even being asked, demonstrating how people are still traumatized. They kept telling about where they were and what they felt when the earthquake occurred, showed videos recorded at the moment by their cell phones. It seemed as if another wound is inflicted at any moment. Asuman, who is the mother of our host family during the project, lost almost all of her biological family members in the earthquake. She and her three sons were hardly able to speak despite getting psychological treatment in the last seven months.

The project venue and its constructive dynamics had been arranged by our local organizer, Malik Durmaz, and the program was free for the locals. We determined to use all recycled materials as much as possible. We walked around and collected anything useful we saw along the roads under the debris, sometimes even horse or donkey excrement or bones. Most days, we sent our local friends to the grocery stores early in the morning to collect their waste for our gardens, herb spiral, and hot composting during the workshops. Although this was embarrassing for them at the beginning, they said after a couple of days, “It’s become a habit now. We look at everything that can be used as a resource when we walk along the streets.”

When we first arrived in Ercis to assess the situation on the ground, we realized that our original program wasn’t going to cover the local people’s emergency needs. We modified our plans accordingly. For instance, after noticing dirt and smell at a corner of the garden where the children play because of the grey water coming from one of the houses, we decided to include a grey-water treatment in the program. Also, there was a wonderful fruit orchard in the garden, but all the bee hives had been destroyed. There was no money or time to replace them on this visit. Therefore, we decided to show how the orchard can be transitioned to a food forest, beginning with comfrey under the fruit trees and cover crops planted along swales. Likewise, we showed how to produce sprouts from seeds that are suitable to their taste, in order to increase nutritional value of the foods, which is especially important in times of scarcity. We foraged in the fields around the town to collect some endemic species to create a special herb garden, because we heard that most of the herb species for their special cheese, Van otlu peyniri, were almost extinct due to careless harvesting for the market economy. These herbs are also used for medicinal purposes and first aid.

Another point is that when we went there to assess the locals’ needs before the workshop, we noticed that some women could not speak Turkish. In response, we created a Kurdish program poster, and found an interpreter for the workshops. We opened the circle using couple of Kurdish words we were learning from the locals every morning.

During the project, instead of showing only how to apply techniques, we made an effort to share the idea of permaculture design by explaining every technique’s benefits in holistic design. For example, we explained to our participants how we positioned hugelkultur in the garden, the function of layering, why the herb spiral is important, how we can harvest sun and water using low-tech approaches, and how to sprout seeds to increase their nutritional value. Moreover, as soon as we arrived there, we guided our host family to collect the organic matter coming from their kitchens and shared the reasons for recycling kitchen wastes. We sometimes asked for rotten foods from markets. All these were elements that helped our participants adopt the main idea of our project. Looking at what we called waste in another way and therefore being self-sufficient instead of being dependent, were the things that we could naturally narrate to our participants, our hosting family, the women, and the children in the family.

Our participant range was diverse—students and lecturers from Ercis Vocational Institution and Centennial University of Van, farmers, those who wanted to learn greenhouse growing or who wanted to do gardening in their private gardens, people from the agriculture department of the municipality, and even two prisoners from an open prison. Additionally, the children were active from the very beginning until the end. They worked with us when we were sowing seeds, preparing the soil mixture for plastering a giant herb spiral, and the like.

ErcisSpiralGardHerb spriral planted with native cullinary and medicinal herbs

We opened our first day of the project with a circle and let our 78-year-old grandmother lead us with her wisdom. We continued this pattern on the following days. In the circles, we asked the participants to introduce themselves in the way they were most comfortable. During our learning sessions, we were attentive to their contributions. We learned about the use of endemic plants in the local diet. We cooked our dinner together every day. We offered free lunch to the participants, ranging from 20 to 35 every day, showing clearly that we were there to share our knowledge and to create something together rather than take something out. This is why our project was also successful in terms of social influences. Above all, having women and children involved in the project made them contemplate themselves and their needs in life from another point. Sevgi, who documented the project with her partner Yasar shared her perspective.

“Among the participants, Asuman was one of the most curious about our ecological restoration applications during the project. In the solar cooker and biochar workshops, she followed Emet’s every word, as she wanted women to be able to use tools in the workshop as well. She used a drill for the first time in her life. She drilled a hole in a used grease bucket at the bottom—it was the first time I saw her grinning from ear to ear since we arrived.”

Another woman participant, named Leyla, also surprised everybody by saying, “the earthquake doesn’t care if you’re a woman or a man—women have to learn survival skills too.”

Emet emphasized the important role in the project for neighborhood children who were traumatized by the earthquake, “In the beginning, I told them to listen and watch us during the day and throughout the project so that they could draw what they were affected by. All children used a board that was already prepared for them and that was named by the children themselves as Red Kid Board where they pinned their drawings and their poems. They made us sometimes smile, sometimes cry, and always think. On the last day, I was very much influenced by the children’s theatrical demonstrations. One girl was telling us about fungi and how they help trees communicate with each other. There was also a hip-hop song, composed and written by them, about the earthquake, which made all of us cry. We were very much impressed by the scenes the children illustrated. They portrayed all too realistically their friends, siblings, and relatives who were trapped in the wreckage.”

The Van-Ercis project was the first project where permaculture has been used for aid in Turkey. We hope this first step will lead to a permanent permaculture aid group in this earthquake-prone country. Emet explains, “The seeds that we sowed in hugelkultur, greenhouse, and food forest with our children and our elders, are going to grow and spread to other projects too. Something tells me this was just the first step in our country.” Ercis’ experience was a representative project for us of becoming whole with people, land, culture, differences, and despair as permaculturists.

We began the work in Ercis with heart and soul. We succeeded in this project because we respected the land and culture as well as the people. We are thankful to our donors and permaculture friends who were willing to help out, including from overseas. Our gratitude goes to the Ercis Technical High School which opened its classrooms for our biochar and solar cooker workshops. Also many thanks to the individuals who made donations to help our dream come true! ∆

Emet Degirmenci completed the Permaculture Design Course in 1997 and has been practicing permaculture around the world. She is the founder of Innermost Gardens in Aotearoa (New Zealand, http://www.innermostgardens.org.nz/  Emet teaches permaculture in her home country Turkey, as well as offers her design services and lectures in Washington (http://nwpcchistory.blogspot.com/). Yeliz Mert is a permaculture trainee and masters student in Sustainable Territorial Development, currently in Italy, where she visits ecovillages and permaculture sites. She is committed to work and contribute to a better life and is willing to spend the next few years in learning, experiencing, and practicing permaculture more deeply worldwide. View a photo album of the Ercis project at https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151018840673637.455182.335518878636&type=3 and videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghU36eQP3Fc and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSRaKwyZ18A&feature=youtu.be.

Reklamlar

Permaculture Aid By Respecting The Land and The Culture

Emet Degirmenci and Yeliz Mert

Emet Degirmenci, who is the pioneer and the ‘Ercis Permaculture Aid’ project, is a former seismologist and current permaculture designer and teacher. She sent a call out to the permaculture related groups in Turkey as soon as a deadly earthquake happened in Van, 23 October 2012. She has been on some field studies during her seismology work to measure the aftershocks and witnessed how difficult the survivors’ lives were. It took them seven months to become organized since the assessment of the local needs and matching these with the skill set. Also some of the team members were living abroad when the earthquake occurred.

As a group; of one instructor, two new permaculture designers including Yeliz and one amateur documentary maker delivered a permaculture aid program between July 1 st to 5th, 2012 to the survivors. Our budget that was formed with some small donations by the individuals was less than $1000 US. We did not want any funding from the institutions since the aid distribution was corrupted during the earthquake. Also, the area which is predominantly Kurdish speaking was quite politicized. We decided to keep the project independent and not to be manipulated by any groups in any ways.

The project that we implemented included; a winter veggie garden that had been built and planted with hugelculture technique, biochar stove and solar cooker making, seed spouting, vertical gardens, food forest establishment techniques, herb spiral, hot composting, and a grey water treatment. Ercis was the epicenter of the earthquake. One third of the town was destroyed and more than 500 hundred people died and many wounded. We named the project ‘Van-Ercis Post-Disaster Ecological Restoration Permaculture Project’. Mainly announcing the project with ‘From Absence to Abundance’ motto, we aimed to eliminate negative influence of the words such as ‘disaster’ and ‘earthquake’ and to show how much we can do with the things that are called ‘waste’ without realizing its value.

 the people and the project location:

A five-day intensive hands-on project was held in our host Ceylan’s extended family court house garden, and we also used the Technical High School in Ercis for biochar stove and the solar cooker making workshops. The eldest of the family, 78 year-old grandmother, has been living in this location with her three children, three daughters in law and eight grandchildren in different houses. While walking through the streets of Ercis, we could witness wreckages and cracked buildings of empty houses and workplaces at every corner although the debris had been cleared. Having felt like a movie scene, this disaster was a reality at first hand for Ceylan’s. The local people we came across in Ercis instantly started telling their memories of the earthquake without even being asked. It was showing clearly how people have still been traumatized. They kept telling about where they were and what they felt when the earthquake occurred, showed videos recorded at the moment by their cell phones. It seemed as if another wound is inflicted at any moment. Asuman, who is the mother of our host family during the project, lost almost all of her biological family members in the earthquake. She and her three sons were hardly able to speak despite getting psychological treatment in the last seven months.

The project venue and its constructive dynamics had been arranged by our local organizer, Malik Durmaz and the program which was free for the locals. We were determined to use all recycle materials as much as possible. We walked around and collected anything useful we saw along the roads under the debris, sometimes even horse or donkey excrement or bones, . Most days we even sent our local friends to the grocery stores early in the morning to collect their waste for our veggie gardens, herb spiral and the hot compost during the workshops. Although this was embarrassing for them at the beginning, they said after couple of days:’It became a habit now. We looked at everything that could be used as a resource for us when we walked along the streets’ .

However, we have noticed that our original program was not covering the local peoples’ emergency needs when we arrived there to access. For instance, after noticing dirt and smell at a corner of the garden where the children play because of the grey water coming from one of the houses, we decided to include a grey water treatment in the program. Also, there was a wonderful fruit orchard in the garden, but all the bee hives were destroyed . There was no reason to spend money and time to create a new one. Therefore, we decided to show the technique how it can be enriched towards a food forest with comfreys under the fruit trees and cover crop along with swales. Likewise, we showed how to produce sprouts from seeds which are suitable to their taste, in order to increase nutritional value of the foods, especially at times of scarcity. We went to the different parts of the field around the town to collect some endemic species to create a special herb garden, because we heard that most of the herb species for their special cheese ‘Van otlu peyniri’ were almost extinct due to a careless harvesting method for the market economy. The herbs are also used for medicinal purposes and fist aid.

Another point is that when we went there to assess the locals’ needs before the workshop, we noticed that some women could not speak Turkish. So we decided to create a Kurdish program poster, and found an interpreter for the workshops.

We opened the circle using couple of Kurdish words we were learning from the locals every morning.

During the project, instead of showing only how to apply techniques, we made an effort to share the idea of permaculture design by explaining every technique’s benefits holistically. For example, we explained to our participants how we positioned hugelculture in the garden, what the use of layering it was, why the herb spiral is important, how we can harvest sun and water and how to sprout seeds to increase their nutritional value, which were applicable in an emergency situation. Moreover, as soon as we arrived there, we guided our host family to collect the organic matter coming from their kitchens and shared why we do it. We sometimes asked for rotten foods from markets. All these were elements that helped our participants adopt the main idea of our project. Looking at what we called waste in another way and therefore being self-sufficient instead of being dependant, were the things that we could naturally narrate to our participants, our hosting family, the women and the children in the family.

Our participant range was diverse. There were students and lecturers from Ercis Vocational Institution and Centennial University of Van, farmers, those who wanted greenhouse cultivating, or who wanted to do gardening in their private gardens, people from the agriculture department of the municipality, and even two prisoners from an open prison. Additionally, the children were active from the very beginning till the end. They worked with us when we were sowing seeds, preparing soil mixture for plastering a giant herb spiral, and the like.

many learnings:

We opened our first day of the project with a circle and let ‘our 78 years old grandmother lead us with her wisdom. On the following days , we continued in the same way. In the circles, we asked every participant to introduce themselves in the way they were most comfortable with, and wanted to get to know each other. In addition to this, during the techniques that were applied, we were attentive to learn about their local diet using endemic plants. We cooked our dinner together everyday. We offered free lunch to the participants, ranging from 20 to 35 everyday, showing clearly that we were there to share our knowledge and to create something together rather than taking something out. This is why our project was also successful in terms of social influences included. Above all, having women and children involved in the project made them contemplate themselves and their needs in life from another point. Dear Sevgi, who was our documenter with her partner Yasar narrates her thoughts as followed:

‘Asuman was one of the most curious participants with our ecological restoration applications during the project. In solar cooker and biochar stove atelier, she obeyed Emet’s word, as she wanted women to be able to use working tools in atelier as well, and took the drill in hand for the first time in her life. She drilled used grease bucket at the bottom. It was the first time that I saw her grinning from ear to ear since we arrived.’ Another woman participant, named Leyla, also took everybody surprised by saying ‘the earthquake does not listen to woman or man, we have to learn it too.’

The project’s instructor Emet particularly emphasizes the important role of the project for children in the neighborhood who have been traumatized by the earthquake: ‘In the beginning, I told them to listen and watch us during the day and throughout the project so that they could draw what they were affected by. All children used a board that was already prepared for them and that was named by the children themselves as ‘Red Kid Board’ where they pinned their drawings and their poems. While we were listening to what was the background of their productions, they made us sometimes smile, sometimes cry and sometimes think. On the last day, I was very much influenced by children’s theatrical demonstrations. One girl was telling us about fungi family and the fungi role, how they help trees communicate with each other. There was also a hip-hop song, composed and written by them, about the earthquake, which made all of us cry. We were very much impressed by the scenes that children illustrated. They stimulated realistically their friends, siblings, relatives of how they were trapped in the wreckage.’

The Van-Ercis project was the first project where permaculture has been used for aid. Ultimately, Emet gave the idea to build a permaculture aid group in Turkey and shortly but we hope this first step will take further to create a permanent permaculture aid group in Turkey which is an earquake prone country. Emet explains, ‘The seeds, that we sowed in hugelculture greenhouse and food forest with our children and our elders, are going to grow and spread to other projects, too. I feel the peace inside that this was the first step in our country. I hope that this motivation will remain. Thanks to our small aid group and the supporters.’ Ercis experience was a representative project for us of becoming a whole with people, land, culture, differences and despair as permaculturist.

We performed Ercis experience with heart and soul but most importantly, by considering locals’ needs and finding appropriate approaches. We succeeded in this project because we respected the land and culture as well as people. We are thankful to our donors and the permiese friends who have sent their willingness to help out, including from overseas. Our gratitude goes to the Ercis Technical High School which opened their classrooms for our biochar and solar cooker workshops. Also many thanks to the individuals who made donations to help our dream come true!

A PHOTO ALBUM OF THE PROJECT

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151018840673637.455182.335518878636&type=3

More  YOUTUBE VIDEOS will be added to this account:

1. Hugelculture green house–> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghU36eQP3Fc

2. Local children’s involvement to the project–> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSRaKwyZ18A&feature=youtu.be

14-22 August 2010 Erdek Permaculture Design and Ecology Restoration Course PROGRAM

Individual and Community Level Sustainability & Ecological Design 

Daily routine: 8 hrs 

Morning session from 8am-12pm 

Afternoon: 1-5pm 

Spontaneous YOGA/Tai-chi in the morning between 7-7:30am -Asking some people to lead and contribute from the group. 

Breakfast: 7-8am 

Lunch: 12-1pm 

  

DAY 1: 14 August 

Morning: 

Welcome SPIRAL, Initial connection, Group gathering & Presentation of the classes 

Activity 1: Team presentation and basic orientations. 

Activity 2: PLAY-The web of life 

Activity 3: Biodance: 

Afternoon: 

Activity 4: Temporary dry/compost toilet building – including a primer on concepts & establishing at the site. 

  

DAY 2: 15 August 

Morning: 

Permaculture Philosophy & Design Principles 

Introduction to ethics and principles of Permaculture. 

Presentation and group discussion 

Twelve practical basic principles  

Presentation of permaculture basic practical Tasarımı principles, with some examples and illustrations using B. Mollison and D. Holmgreen inspirations and our group experiences. 

Afternoon: 

Activity 1: Listening nature and finding the patterns and resources. Preparation of personal map of whishes (each one or small groups prepares a basic draft of their place or community plot to be Tasarımıed at Ocaklar/Erdek throughout the course) 

Activity 2: How the principles and role playing how it work 

some of the principles and applications taken from B. Mollison and others and his experience across the world.   Slide show & role play 

  

DAY 3: 16 August 

Landscape & Site Assessment 

Morning: 

How to read the landscape and natural patterns. 

Technics and observation of landforms and gathering information. 

Activity : Guided raid through the place and observation of nature and processes. Looking for the individual experiences and sharing class knowledges. 

Afternoon: 

A ride through a community facility to ‘Pasalimanı’ local community project. We will be gathering information on vegetation and fauna, local micro and macro geological and ecological processes, social situation and learning how to present them. 

  

DAY 4: 17 August 

Soil, Gardening, Edible plants & It’s Diversity 

Morning: 

Activity 1. Soil test 

Activity 2. Building a compost/hot compost 

Activity 3. Building a spiral herb garden 

Afternoon: 

Presentation:  Every group shares their experience/skills with the large group. 

Guest Speaker: 

Vehbi Ersöz has experience more than 10 years as an organic producer and sells at Şişli and Kartal Organic Market/Istanbul and takes box orderders. 

http://www.bugday.org/tatuta/farmDetail.php?ID=7&lang=EN 

  

DAY 5: 18 August 

Water & water Harvesting 

Morning: 

Identifying natural sources and its cycles, purify and treatment techniques, storage, harvesting, use and conservation *aquaculture*. 

Practice 1: Purifying water 

Practice 2 : Making a gray water plant treatment system or artificial wetland (Creating a rain Garden). 

Practice 3 : Swales 

Afternoon: 

Presenttaion: The way people in the Caribe (Colombia, Panamá, Guatemala,Cuba and other places) hyper-oxygenates water in a bottle and set it for couple of days exposed to the plain sun to kill bacteria 

Planning/ building a dry latrine. 

  

DAY 6: 19 August 

Air & Climate 

Building resiliency in Climate change. Understanding micro climates. 

Morning: 

The impact of small autonomic communities and the CO2 and energy economy  

Climate Justice & discussion based on Turkey’s drought & floats etc.  

Practice: Building shelter beds for plants and animals 

Afternoon: 

Energy & Technology: 

Learn how to become more self reliant and energy efficient. 

Practice1: Build a fruit/herbs dryer with local materials and see for some fruits of local interest 

Pactice 2: Building a magic pot 

Social experience on that: Solar cooking and local development in Chile and Colombia and other places 

  

DAY 7: 20 August 

Morning: 

Orchards, Row Crops & Animals -chicken, bee , goat/sheep & cow 

The best crops for climate and site characteristics. Planting and propagation. Small animals 

Practice 1: Pruning and crafting. 

Afternoon: 

Practice 3: Building an integrated chickens house / composting / greenhouse system. 

The technic has to be included if it is to be used by the local people. 

Guest speaker: 

Kadir Dadan- Another Food  Is Possible Ocaklar/ERDEK 

http://picasaweb.google.com.tr/kadir.dadan/DogaVePolitikaSoylesileri1# 

  

DAY 8: 21 August 

Morning: 

Integrating Animals & Forestry 

Grazing and forestry management 

Basis of community successions and Tasarımı in general and for the place. 

Practice: Planting a tree with companions. (Natural spontaneous yard and community analysis for the place) 

Built Environment , Healthy Home & Ecobuilding: 

Eco building and construction: Use of local materials, straw, wood, mud, stones, wastes like bottles, plastic, cans, tires … Examples across the world.. Living within nature, with nature, and in nature 

Practice : Building a straw wall and warm place for the chicken/compost/winter house integrated system 

Afternoon: 

Hazards & Catastrophes: 

Natural,social & economic hazards 

Practice: Simulation of disaster and solutions for sanitation, water and food, social integration and other issues about. 

Different groups propose solutions earthquake, general strike and  war situation e.g how to build a  refugee camp, an intercultural gathering, an ecological disaster in Turkey. 

EVENING: A SKYPE connection with an  eco-community in Latin America-El Bosque “Blowing in The Wind” ecovillage in Chile 

  

DAY 9: 22 August 

Urban Living 

Ideas for retrofitting cities. Building eco-communities alternative economy and development. 

Case Study: Co-ops and ecovillage examples in Turkey. 

Guest speaker: 

 Abdullah Aysu-Turkish Peasant Sendicate 

Agriculture of Turkey and the Movement 

http://www.karasaban.net/category/yazarlar/aaysu/ 

Economy & Alternative Currency 

Practice: or Role playing about barter system/community exchange and gift economy. 

Planning a community orchards and city harvesting systems. 

Cultures & Invisibles: 

Community building, decision making and conflict resolution. 

Local organic communities and federalism 

Power management and the making of state (the view from Clastres) 

Remaking Society. 

Ecovillages across the world: high diversity, higher potentialities, higher politics. 

Myths, beliefs and religions from people. 

Braking the pipelines: A metaphor of dependence and the problem of size of the solution. Comments on the remaking of freedom. 

CLOSING CIRCLE: 

Group Project presentations 

Making the future: Negotiations, agreements, links, future activities and compromises within the group and between students and us. 

Initiation to Change the World through permaculture & social engagement 

NOTE 

Each evening a permaculture movie/slayt show and diyalog!!! 

We are trying to make more SKYPE connection with different  ecovillages from other Latin American countries. Feel free to ask intriguing questions during this interactive communication.

PROGRAM 14-22 Agustos 2010 Erdek Permakültür ve Ekoloji Restorasyonu Kursu

ERDEK PERMAKÜLTÜR ve EKOLOJİ RESTORASYONU KURSU 14-22 AGUSTOS 2010 (English is below) 

Kişisel ve Toplumsal Sürdürülebilir Bir Yaşam İçin Permakültür Tasarımı  

Ayrıntılı bilgi ve Agustín Sepúlveda Sariego ile Emet Değirmenci’nin özgeçmişleri için: https://kendineyeterlitoplum.wordpress.com/

Facebook grubu:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kendine-Yeterli-Toplum-BilgiBeceriDeneyimKaynak-Paylasim-Agi/335518878636?ref=ts

Kursa eğitimcilerin yanı sıra, Abdullah Aysu, Metin Yegin, Vehbi Ersöz, Kadir Dadan ve konuya ilişkin emek veren değerli dostlarımız konuk konuşmacı olarak katılacaklardır.

Günlük rutin: 8 saat

6:30-7 YOGA/Tai Chi- Grubun katkısıyla

Kahvaltı: 7-8 arası

Sabah dersleri: 8-12

Öğleden sonra: 2-5

Akşam: çeşitli permakültür filmleri, söyleşi, sohbet ve sunumlar.  

1. GÜN – 14 Agustos Cumartesi

Sabah:

HOŞGELDİNİZ SPİRALİ:  Birbirimizi tanıma ve kurs programının tanıtılması

Pratik 1: Ekip tanıtımları ve temel oryantasyon

Pratik 2: OYUN- Yaşam Ağı

Pratik 3: İnsan doğanın parçası – BİYODANS

Öğleden Sonra:

Atıkların kaynak halıne getirme

Pratik 4: Kompost tuvalet yapımı – inşa etme konseptiyle birlikte

2. GÜN – 15 Agustos

Sabah:

Permakültür Fesefesi ve Tasarım İlkeleri

Permakültür etiği ve ilkelerinin tanıtımı

12 pratik temel ilkenin tanıtımı B. Mollison ve D. Holmgreen ‘den esinlenerek görsel malzemelerle yapılacak. Kendi yaşamımıza ve yapacağımız grup etkinliklerine somut olarak nasıl uygulayabileceğimiz tartışılacaktır.

Dizayn metodolojileri

Permakültür Tasarımcısının Kontrol Listesi

Sunuş ve grup tartışması

Öğleden sonra:

Permakültür prensipleri doğada nasıl çalışır – B. Mollison ve diğer uygulamalar, slayt gösterisi  ve oyun.

Pratik 1: Doğayı Dinlemek,  Örüntülerini ve Kaynaklarını Bulmak icin dogada gozlem yapma yontemleriç

Pratik 2:  Sulak alan ve yarı tropık alan ekolojıleri

Pratik 3:  İstediğiniz bir proje için kişisel harita yapmak- Her grup kendi taslağını yapabilir. Ya da ziyaret edeceğimiz Erdek Ocaklar’daki toplumsal bir proje konu olarak alınabilir.

3. GÜN – 16 Agustos

Permakültür Zonları, Sektör Analizi,  Arazi Düzenlemesi ve Arazinin Değerlendirilmesi

Sabah:

Araziyi ve doğal örüntüleri nasıl okuyacağız?

Projemizi zonrara göre nasıl planlayacagız ve sektörleri projemizde nasıl değerlendirecegiz?

Arazi düzenlemesi ve Arazinin Değerlendirilmesi

Gözlem teknikleri ve bilgi toplama

Pratik 1: Arazide gruplar halinde gözlem yapıp deneyimleri geniş grupla paylaşıyoruz.

Öğleden sonra:

Pratik 2: Paşalimanı ziyareti.  Bitki örtüsü, canlılar, mikro iklim ve makro jeolojik yapı,  ekolojik ve toplumsal veri toplayıp değerlendiriyoruz. 

4.GÜN – 17 Agustos

Sürdürülebilir tarım

Toprağı ekolojik olarak restore eden  ve birbirini destekleyen çeşitli yenebilir bitkiler içeren bahçecilik konsepti

Tarım ve bahçecilikte zarralılarla başa çıkma

Sabah:

Pratik  1: Toprak analizi

Pratik  2: Çeşitli tekniklerle bahçeler ve bostanlar tarım arazileri için kompost yapma

Pratik  3: Şifalı otlar spirali yapma

Öğleden sonra:

Her grubun odaklandığı üç değişik projenin gruplar tarafından sunumu ve bilgi beceri paylaşımı

Konuk Konuşmacı:

Vehbi Ersöz: 10 yıldan fazla ekolojik meyve sebze yetiştirme deneyiminde pazar bulma ve insanlarla etkileşim deneyimi.

http://www.bugday.org/tatuta/farmDetail.php?ID=7&lang=TR

5. GÜN : 18 Agustos

SU: Toplama ve Koruma

Sabah:

Doğal ‘kaynakları’ ve bunların yeryüzündeki döngülerini anlama, su arındırma, toplama, kullanmayı ve su içinde yetişen yenebilir canlıları tanıma.

Pratik 1: Kirli bulanık suyu kullanılır ve içilir hale getirmek

Pratik 2: Atık grı siyak su prosesi

Pratik 3: Su hendeği yaratma

Öğleden sonra:

Kolombia, Panamá, Guatemala, Küba ve diğer ülkelerdeki suyu içilebilir hale getirmek için yapılan ‘hiper-oksijenleme’ tekniklerinin görsel olarak anlatımı.

6. GÜN : 19 Agustos

Hava ve İklim

Sabah:

İklimi, mikroiklimleri ve küresel iklim değişikliğini anlama 

Küresel İklim Değişikliği Sınır tanımıyor – Sunu ve tartışma

Enerji Ekonomisine Bir Bakış – Sunu ve tartışma

Tartışma: Türkiye’de iklim değişikliğinin sonuçlarından olan  artan kuraklık ve sel baskınları için neler yapılabilir?

Öğleden sonra:

Enerji ve Teknoloji:

Enerji üretmek, uygun teknolojiler, yenilenebilir enerji ve enerji verimliliği

Şili ve Kolombiya’da güneşte pişirme yerel hareketleri

Pratik 1: Yerel malzemelerle sebze ve meyva kurutucusu yapma

Pratik 2:  Sihirli yemek pişiricisi yapma

7. GÜN : 20 Agustos

Sabah:

Ağaçlara bakım ve küçük ve büyükbaş hayvanlarının entegrasyonu -tavuk, arı, keçi, koyun vb.

İklim ve arazi karakterine göre en uygun ve iyi ürünü nasıl yetiştireceğiz?

Ekim ve çoğaltma

Pratik 1: Budama ve aşılama

Öğleden sonra:

Pratik 2: Yerel kültür ve geleneklerle bağlantılı tavuk kümesi inşası ve bunun kompost ve sera ile etkileşimi.

Konuk Konuşmacı:

Kadir Dadan– Baska Gıda Mümkün Girişimi Ocaklar/ERDEKç

http://picasaweb.google.com.tr/kadir.dadan/DogaVePolitikaSoylesileri1#

http://www.yesilvesol.org/

8. GÜN : 21 Ağustos

Sabah:

Orman ve Hayvanların Ağaçlarla Entegrasyonu

Hayvan yemi olarak ağaç yetiştirme

Tavukların ve diger küçük hayvanların yiyecek ormanıyla entegrasyonu

Pratik: Bitki ve ağaçlar birbirini destekleyecek şekilde ağaç dikimi; doğal kendiliğinden bitkilerin yetiştiği bir bahçe ve böyle bir yer için toplumsal analiz. 

Mimari-Yapılı Çevre, Sağlıklı Ev ve Eko yapılar:

Yerel malzemelerden (çamur, saman, plastik ve cam şişe, araba lastiği) sığınak inşası ve yapının doğayla entegrasyonu. Dünya çapında örnekler görsel olarak sergilenecek.

Pratik 1: Tavuklar için saman balyasından ev yapımı ve kış için entegrasyonu.

Öğleden sonra:

Afet ve Acil Durumlarda Ne Yapmalı?

Doğal, Toplumsal ve Ekonomik Afet ve Acil Durumlar

Pratik 2: Hijyen, su, sığınak, yiyecek ve sosyal gereksinimlerin karşılanması için simulasyon yapma

Gruplar değişik senaryolar üzerinde çalışıp herkesle paylaşacak.

AKSAM: Latin Amerika da bir eko-toplulukla GÖRÜNTÜLÜ CANLI SKYPE bağlantısı-

Şili’de Rüzgarda Uçan Köy, El Bosque.

9. GÜN : 22 Agustos

Sabah:

Kent ve Köy Yaşamı

Şehirleri ekolojik hale dönüştürüp köyle entegrasyonu nasıl sağlayacağız?

Kent bahçeleri.bostanları yaratmak

Konuk konuşmacı:

Abdullah Aysu – Çiftçi Sendikaları Başkanı

Türkiye’de Tarım ve Tarım Hareketi

http://www.karasaban.net/category/yazarlar/aaysu/

Alternatif Ekonomi ve Para

Pratik: Toplum bazında değiş tokuş sistemi ve hediye ekonomisi nasıl kurulur?

Toplum, Kültür ve Görünmez Kılınanlar:

Toplumu yeniden kurma, karar verme ve uyuşmazlık çözümü

Yerel organik topluluklar ve biyo bölgeler

Dünya dan değişik ekoköy örnekleri

Pratik:  Bağımlılık ve çözümleri

Kapanış  Çemberi :

Geleceği permakültürle yaratmak 

Geleceğe yönelik çalışmalar, projeler ve birlikte yapabileceklerimiz. 

***

NOT:

Her aksam  değişik bir konuda permakültür film/slayt gösterimi- sunum ve üzerine sohbet!!!

+

Yukardaki SKYPE bağlantısına ek olarak Latin Amerika’nın başka ülkelerindeki çeşitli eko-köylerle de SKYPE bağlantsı kurulması planlanmaktadır. Bu interaktif iletişim sırasında istediğiniz soruları sorabileceksiniz.

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